Peer counseling dating violence

HOPE (4673) EMPACT – Sexual Assault Hotline: 480.736-4949 or 866.205.5229Family Advocacy Center – City of Phoenix:, 602.534.2120 or 1.888.246.0303 Love Is Respect – National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline: 1-866-331-9474 or 1.866.331.8453 TTY Maricopa County Attorney’s Office Victim Services: 602.506.8522 Northland Family Help Center: 24-Hour Crisis Line: (928) 527-1900 Our Family Services: (520) 323-1708 ext.510 Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault: 24-Hour Crisis Line: (520) 327-7273 or (800) 400-1001Arizona State University Wellness & Health Promotion: (480) 965-1996 edu/wellness National Sexual Violence Resource Center: Survivor Support: for Disease Control: Sexual Violence Prevention: gov/Violenceprevention/sexualviolence/The Trevor Project (For GLBTQ Youth): 1.866.4. TREVOR (1.866.488.7386) Wingspan Anti-Violence Crisis Line Toll Free: 520.624.0348 or 1.800.553.9387 *Q Line – Resources and 24 Hr.Few studies have given voice to the individuals themselves.Dating serves as an important developmental milestone as individuals come to understand social and relational goals.In a 2014 survey, 20% of teens report they've been the victim or perpetrator of physical or sexual abuse.60% say that psychological abuse has occurred in their relationships.

Their clinical services include individual, group and family counseling, psychological, psychiatric and psychosocial assessments and diagnosis, psychopharmacology, and HIV/AID services.This phenomenology investigated how adolescents conceptualize and experience dating relationships.We explored adolescent females’ definitions of healthy and abusive relationships, experiences with unhealthy relationships, and responses to dating violence in order to develop effective strategies to intervene with this population.There are significant mental, physical and behavioral consequences of adolescent dating violence, including depression, anxiety, PTSD, suicidal ideation, poor self-concept, disordered eating, substance use/abuse, risky sexual behavior, and school disengagement (Ackard & Neumark-Sztainer, 2002; Banyard & Cross, 2008; Howard, Beck, Kerr, & Shattuck, 2005; Howard, Wang, & Yan, 2007; Masho & Ahmed, 2007; O’Keefe, 2005; Silverman, Raj, Mucci, & Hathaway, 2001).Due to the severity of negative health outcomes, it is imperative for counselors to understand the experiences of adolescents to facilitate early intervention with this at risk population (Hays et al., 2007).

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